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© 2016 by Nicole Craanen

 

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14. RISK & PERIL

PATTERNS

WELL-BEING BENEFITS

  • INCREASE Preference (1, 2)
ENVIRONMENTAL

“Two roads diverged in a wood and I - I took the one less traveled by, and that has made all the difference.                                                                             - Robert Frost

THE BASICS

An environment with Risk and Peril may feel dangerous or imply a threat, but has a reliable safeguard.  What Risk/Peril seeks is the thrill of an experience, coupled with awe.  Standing at the edge of a waterfall or on a mountain ledge both exhilarates and grows our appreciation of nature.  Similarly, standing at the tip of The Infinity Room of The House on the Rock, jutting 218 feet beyond the hill and 156 feet above the valley floor, or peering out over the waterfall at Frank Lloyd Wright’s Falling Water, inspire similar feelings of thrill and awe. 

 

A study conducted by Ronald Rapee indicates that the difference between fear and Risk/Peril, is the perceived sense of threat and control (1).  Taking into consideration this perceived sense of threat and control, an interior environment may approach Risk/Peril quite differently.  A balcony or catwalk overlooking a space or a transparent railing may produce a feeling of thrill or awe on a smaller scale.

RISK & PERIL IDEAS:
Perceived sense of threat coupled with control:
  • Catwalk or balcony
  • Cantilever
  • Infinity edge
  • Floor to ceiling transparent facade
  • Transparent floor
  • Proximity to water
  • Safe access to predatory animals
  • Exploration of the unknown
 

CATWALK OR BALCONY

 

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CANTILEVER

 

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TRANSPARENT FLOOR

 

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PROXIMITY TO WATER

 

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EXPLORATION OF THE UNKNOWN

 

All Photo Credits: Nicole Craanen