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© 2016 by Nicole Craanen

 

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6. DYNAMIC & DIFFUSE DAYLIGHT

  • DECREASE Medication Consumption (7)
  • DECREASE Hospitalization Stay (1, 6)
  • REGULATION of Body Systems (8)
  • DECREASE Stress (7)
  • DECREASE Pain Experience (7)
  • DECREASE Sick Leave (2)
  • LOWER Blood Pressure (8)
  • INCREASE Oxygen Saturation Levels (8)
PHYSICAL
ENVIRONMENTAL
  • INCREASE Preference (4)
INTELLECTUAL
  • INCREASE Test Scores (3)
  • IMPROVE Speed of Learning (3)
  • INCREASE Productivity (3)
  • INCREASE Altertness (8)
EMOTIONAL
  • INCREASE Preference (4)
  • INCREASE Feelings of Productivity & Creativity (4)
  • INCREASE Sense of Well-Being (4, 5)
  • DECREASE Perception of Stress (7)

WELL-BEING BENEFITS

PATTERNS

“Every moment of light and dark is a miracle.” 

-Walt Whitman                                                        

 

THE BASICS

 

Dynamic and diffuse light refers to lighting effects achieved in nature.  Rarely in nature would one see uniform light that does not change throughout the day.  Light intensity and color changes throughout the day, and other aspects of nature interact with it (clouds, trees, etc.)  Light interacts with many of the other strategies and should be considered in conjunctin with them.  Care should be taken to minimize glare and adjustability by the user helps minimize discomfort (9).  

 

 

Although today daylighting is a common topic in the green building rating system systems, many buildings had neglected for some time, and there are a large amount of currently standing buildings allowing no natural light. 

1

st

most wanted element in the workplace (14)

natural lighting is the

64% of US workers report having no natural light in their office (14)

Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen

Research Fun Fact #15

Surgical patients placed on the "bright" side of the hospital vs the "dim" side received 46% higher intensity light on average. The patients on the "bright" side:

  • perceived less stress

  • had marginally less pain

  • consumed 22% less analgesic medication per hour resulting in 21% lower medication costs (15)

Research Fun Fact #16

Office workers who rated their light quality and views as poor took 6.5% more sick leave! (11)

Research Fun Fact #17

A study of 21,000 students looked at student tests scores over a school year and found:

  • Students with most daylighting in classrooms progressed:

    • 20% faster on math tests

    • 26% faster on reading tests

  • Classrooms with the largest window areas progressed:

    • 15% faster in math

    • 23% faster in reading

  • Classrooms with a well-designed skylight (diffused light, gave teachers control over amount of light) progressed:

    • 19-20% faster

  • Students in rooms with windows that could be opened progressed:

    • 7-8% faster than in rooms with fixed windows.

  • Students in classrooms with the most daylight saw:

    • 7-18% higher test scores (12)

Daylight Color Changes throughout the Day

 

  • Sleep and awake patterns

  • Body temperature

  • Heart rate

  • Brain wave activity

  • Hormone production

  • Cell regeneration (10)

Circadian Rhythm

 

A biological process often known as a "body clock" that regulates many of our systems.

It runs on approximately a 24-hour cycle and is affected by changing light and temperature (10).

 

Cicadian Rhythm is linked to:  

 

 

Daylight changes color throughout the day, beginning with yellow in the morning, blue in the early afternoon, and red in the late afternoon and evening.  Blue light helps to increase serotonin, waking the body, and red light produces melatonin, preparing it for sleep.  This also shows how the blue light from electronics can harm sleep patterns.  If access to windows is not possible, circadian lighting systems are available. 

Research Fun Fact #18

A study of 8000 3rd through 6th grade students in 450 classrooms found daylight important for learning and offered suggestions based on the results:

  • Student learning is better supported with a view out of a window including vegitation, or visual information in the distance

  • Glare negatively impacts learning, especially in courses where the instruction is primarily visual

  • Direct sun is often associated with glare, thermal discomfort, and negative student performance (13)

  • Direct Sunlight
  • Seasonal Light
  • Moonlight
  • Dappled Light
  • Moving Shadows
  • Simulated Circadian Lighting
  • Accent Lighting
  • Adjustable Lighting

Other Considerations

 

Flexible and adjustable lighting available increases satisfaction.  Also consider creating visual interest by allowing light and shadows to shift over the course of a day or with changing weather patterns.  Movement of light can mimic natural occurrences, like dappled light coming through vegetation, increasing complexity. Uniform lighting can increase boredom and fatigue, but drastic lighting can create distraction or glare.

SIMULATED NATURE
NATURALLY OCCURRING

NATURE EXPERIENCE OF LIGHT

All Photo Credits: Nicole Craanen

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All Photo Credits: Nicole Craanen

 

Some more Great Examples of Unexpected Sensory Stimuli

(a range of applications & styles is are shown below)

The Lourve
Paris, France
Photo/Video Credit: Nicole Craanen
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Airforce Academy
Colorado Springs, Colorado, USA
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Art and Culture Centre
Bangkok, Thailand
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
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Colectivo
Wauwatosa, Wisconsin, USA
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
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Cambodia
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
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Florence, Italy
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Florence, Italy
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Amber Fort
Jaipur, India
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Amber Fort
Jaipur, India
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Casa Mila
Barcelona, Spain
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
New Dehli, India
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Cesky Krumlov, Czech Republic
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Rome, Italy
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Kentuck Knob
Dunbar, Pennsylvania USA
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Art and Culture Centre
Bangkok, Thailand
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Lyfe Kitchen
Evanston, Illinois, USA
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Madison Public Library
Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Anderson Japanese Garden
Rockford, Illinois, USA
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Kavarna Quality Coffee
Green Bay, Wisconsin, USA
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Siem Reap, Cambodia
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Sailing Club
Nha Trang, Vietnam
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Angkor Wat, Cambodia
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Metis
Hoi An, Vietnam
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
Royal Citadel
Hue, Vietnam
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen
UW-Madison, Union South
Madison, Wisconsin, USA
Photo Credit: Nicole Craanen